Past Exhibitions

August 20 - October 19, 2019

Common Weal Community Arts Presents Axenet'i Tth'al by Michele Mackasey, Manuel Chantre and the community of Patuanak. 

Rigmor Clarke: A Retrospective

June 11th 2019 - July 27th 2019

Rigmor Clarke, The Silver Forest, oil on canvas, 48" x 48". Collection of Dorthy Booker-Tymchatyn and Ed Tymchatyn, Saskatoon.

2019 marks 70 years since Rigmor Clarke arrived in Canada from her birthplace of Sweden. In this time her work as a visual artist and an arts educator has fostered a supportive, creative, and strong community in north-central Saskatchewan. A canoe trip on the Churchill River first cemented Rigmor’s love for nature and its history, and the wilderness of northern Saskatchewan became the primary subject of her painting, clay, woodworking, and printmaking.

Rigmor Clarke’s practice is an expression of the variety and ever-changing conditions of the large, natural world in which she feels fortunate to exist. For Rigmor, art and nature is who she is. In turn, her pieces provide a different perspective of Saskatchewan, one that defies the open and flat prairie narrative. From her vigorous, intimate plein air sketches to  her monumental canvases of sweeping brushstrokes and sensitive colours, in Rigmor’s work, there is both a celebration of the northern terrain and a sense of respect and intimacy with the land. Join us for this celebration of a lifetime of inspired and dedicated painting, printmaking and ceramic work in the Main Gallery.

Straight Outta Mann Art: 8th Annual High School Juried Art Show

April 12th, 2019 – May 25th, 2019

Trapanda Umperville, Carlton Comprehensive High School, Gr. 12

Stranger Things, graphite and charcoal

The Mann Art Gallery's 8th Annual High School Juries Art Show celebrates the artistic achievements of Prince Albert and area high school students in grades 9-12. Our annual exhibition allows students and art instructors to share the fruits of their creative labours with our community in a professional gallery space. This year we are proud to display 60 artworks from 7 education groups:

Carlton Comprehensive High School, Dumont Technical Institute, Learners with Purpose (Wesmor), St. Mary High School, Wesmor Public High School, Won-ska Cultural School, and a homeschool family from Melfort.

We thank all of our student artists for their hard work, dedication, and courage in submitting their works for public display. Thank you for sharing your artistic vision with us! Educators, thank you for your ceaseless in encouraging your students towards excellence in the visual arts. We are thankful to the Prince Albert Council for the Arts, local artist Cheryl Ring, and the John V. Hicks Memorial Fund for sponsoring awards.

Audrey Dreaver: NO. I do not speak Cree

April 9th 2019 - May 25th 2019

Audry Dreaver, So...which word do I use? acrylic on canvas, paper, 2015 152.5cm x 152.5cm, Photograph by Gary Robins

The exhibition NO. I do not speak Cree, presented a collection of quietly elegant and yet powerful images by Saskatchewan nehiyawak (plains Cree) artist, Audrey Dreaver. Developed during a Masters of Fine Arts program at the University of Regina, the resulting paintings and prints document her research into her family's history of Cree language loss and consider how this loss has impacted her cultural identity as a Cree woman. Int this exploration, Dreaver poses questions: How did my family come to lose our language? Is you language who you are? Does my inability to speak my language mean that i am less Cree? The artist invited the viewers to engage in her exploration and consider if language loss affects identity by breaking continuity with one's past and culture.

Audrey Dreaver is nehiyawak (Plains Cree) and grew up in Prince Albert; her family comes from the Mistawasis and Ahtahkakoop Cree Nations of Saskatchewan. Dreaver received her MFA in painting from the University of Regina (2015), her BFA in painting, printmaking, and small metal sculptures, and her Ba in Museum Studies in curating and Native art history from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Since returning to Canada in 2008 Dreaver has worked as an independent consultant and curator focusing on art instruction, Aboriginal art history, and exhibition development.

Paintings by Mac Hone & Friends

Opening Reception: November 16th, 2018 at 7 PM

November 16th, 2018 – January 12th, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

McGregor Hone, Brass and Brown, n.d, mixed media, MAG Permanent Collection

The Mann Art Gallery is pleased to present a selection of paintings by Prince Albert-born artist McGregor Hone and his friends, teachers, and colleagues who are represented in the Permanent Collection. McGregor Hone & Friends shows the

spectrum of the techniques, subjects, and stylistic elements found in his original prints. Mac Hone was born in Prince Albert in 1920. He received a Bachelor of Arts and a Certificate in Education from the University of Saskatchewan, and frequently attended the Artist Workshops at Emma Lake. Mac had an immense impact as both an artist and educator: his painting By The Radio was the first piece to be acquired by the Saskatchewan Arts Board for their Permanent Collection, and he was instrumental in the development of the fine arts program at Central Collegiate in Regina.

 

This exhibition is possible thanks to a generous donation to the Mann Art Gallery from the families of David Hone and Jim Hall. March 2015, they gifted a collection of artwork spanning the careers of McGregor and Beth Hone. Imprint is the second in a series of annual exhibitions that will show the Hone body of work in this unique collection.

Kim Ennis: At the Threshold

November 16th, 2018 – January 12th, 2019

Kim Ennis, Vast Land, 2015, acrylic on panel, 15 x 15"

At the Threshold shows Kim Ennis’ desire for movement beyond a horizon of present limitation, a situation that he likens to a state of prayer. Ennis takes his inspiration from the idea that there is no fixed reality. Rather, this series of paintings are points of meditation that emerge from Baha’i teachings and thought, and explore colour as a sacred element of painting. Specifically, red, black, and gold are drawn from medieval altarpieces, greens are from the Exalted One, and white is from cloud and mist. The composition of each work is reminiscent of the mandela and encourages viewers to consider their place within the vastness of creation

Catherine Blackburn: New Age Warriors

Presented in partnership with the Indigenous Peoples Artist Collective

September 14th, 2018 – October 25th, 2018

Opening Reception: September 14th, 2018 at 7 PM

Catherine Blackburn, The Churchill Challenger, 2018, photograph

Catherine Blackburn, of Dene and European roots, is part of a new generation of contemporary beaders on the prairies who has made a name for herself nationally and internationally in the past few years. Much of her earlier work, including 'But there's No Scar, Our Mother(s) Tongue, and Tell Me the Truth grapples with themes of loss and survivance, and similar concepts underpin this exhibition. Yet in many ways, this is a series that defies the spaces she has most commonly treaded. New Age Warriors opens conversations about Indigenous innovation, ways to live on the land in the twenty-first century, and how love serves as a mighty force. With gear designed from plastic beads, Blackburn draws from the past and present to shape notions about an imagined future - a future filled with strong Indigenous women in protective Armour battling stereotypes and facing colonialism by channeling the power of love.  Dr. Carmen Robertson, 2018

Exhibition Touring Dates:

Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery

February 1st - May 5th, 2019

Neutral Ground Artist Run Centre

Jun 15th - August 3rd, 2019

Chapel Gallery (North Battleford, SK)

September 9th - November 4th, 2019

Art Gallery of Swift Current

March 7th - May 3rd, 2020

Northern Image Photographers

September 14th, 2018 – October 25th, 2018

Roman Orynik, Out of this World, 2018, Digital photography

Founded on the principle of excellence in photography, the Northern Image Photographers is a club composed of local people of all ages who share an interest in improving their photography, both technically and conceptually. The work of the Northern Image Photographers is  celebrated through an annual exhibition hosted by the Mann Art Gallery. Each year the gallery Director/Curator sets a theme or direction for members to explore in their photography, and members’ work is exhibited in the fall. The 2017 theme is “beyond the comfort zone.”

Joe Fafard: Retailles

June 1st, 2018 – August 25th, 2018

Reception & Artist Talk: Friday June 1st, 7:00 PM

Joe Fafard, Coureur Des Bois, 2011,Powder coated laser cut steel, 71.1 x 124.5 x 17.8 cm

Internationally renowned, Joe Fafard is one of Canada’s most recognized and prolific artists. Fafard’s artistic practice is always evolving, driven by his endless experimentation with subject matter, media, process, and technology. Whether in clay, bronze or steel sculpture, or in drawing and printmaking, Fafard’s work is characterized by his connection to his rural roots, his reverence for art history, his inquiry into form, and his interest in three-dimensional illusion and perspective.
Retailles offers an insight into Fafard’s exploration of the laser-cut process and his creative renderings of its by-products. This show presents a collection of laser-cut and welded metal sculptures along with embossed and woodcut prints. French for “scraps” or “trimmings” or “that which is cut away,” Retailles not only references the act of removing the negative space from the positive to create form, but refers to the act of recycling these “out-cuts” to create new works.

Organized by Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery and Art Gallery of Swift Current.

Prince Albert Grand Council

Fine Arts Festival Selections

June 1st, 2018 – August 25th, 2018

The Mann Art Gallery is honoured to host this selection of outstanding artworks by elementary and high school students from Prince Albert Grand Council schools. These works were displayed April 16 – 19, 2018, at the annual Prince Albert Grand Council Fine Arts Festival, which has become a showcase for First Nations´ students displaying a wide range of artistic talent. During this weeklong event, students participate in visual arts, drama, dance, music, literature, and learn hands-on skills to enhance their talents.

Many of the works on display received awards at the PACG Fine Arts Festival in their submission categories. Congratulations to all students who created and displayed artworks this year.  The Mann Art Gallery  is pleased to provide a venue so these dynamic artworks can be on display all summer and testify to the exceptional artistic achievements of First Nations youth.

Thank you very much to Shona Stapleton, members of PAGC, and all of the teachers, students, and organizers who have assisted us in bringing this exhibition to the Mann Art Gallery. Thank you to the students and teachers of the following PACG Schools with work on display:

 

Bell's Point Elementary School (Air Ronge)

Bernard Constant Community School (James Smith)

Father Megret Elementary School (Wollaston)

Keethanow Elementary (Stanley Mission)

Kimosom Pwatinahk Collegiate (Deschambault Lake)

Little Red River School

Mamawe Awasis (Red Earth)

Nihithow Awasis School (Grandmother's Bay)

Reindeer Lake School

Rhoda Hardlotte Memorial High School (Stanley Mission)

Sally Ross School (Hall Lake)

Senator Allen Bird Memorial School (Montreal Lake)

 

Wacihk School (Shoal Lake)

 

 

 

Artwork for this exhibition was selected by Jesse Campbell, Director/Curator, and Lana Wilson, Gallery Educator, of Mann Art Gallery.  Thank you to Katherine Roy-Chovin and Baily Scaife, Assistant Educator Summer Interns, for arranging and hanging the exhibition.

Iris Hauser & Cate Francis: Narratives

April 13th, 2018 – May 23rd, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday April 13th, 7:00 PM

 

 

​​

Visual art is inextricably linked to storytelling and narratives. In this exhibition, Iris Hauser and Cate Francis
document their different experiences with and approaches to narrative. Hauser regularly references familiar
symbols and draws from Biblical, mythological, and common stories and applies them to modern day
experiences. Francis focuses on less of a didactic role of narrative. Rather, in her screenprints, she hones in on
printmaking’s role within the dissemination of anatomical diagrams. Both artists explore how the human
figure is linked to narrative, but in relation to the histories of their respective media.

Iris Hauser, Minding Manners, 2014, oil on canvas, 90 x 120 cm

7th Annual High School Juried Art Show

April 13th, 2018 – May 23rd, 2018
Opening Reception and Awards Presentation: Friday April 13th, 7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The imagination, talents, and hard work of local youth are celebrated in this exhibition that
represents schools from Prince Albert and the surrounding region. The diversity of work
featured in the High School Juried Art Show highlights the idea that inspiration comes in many
forms and that art and art making allows us to share our unique experiences with others.
Schools are involved with the Mann Art Gallery through educational tours, hands-on activities,
work experience and volunteer terms, and outreach projects. This exhibition provides a further
opportunity for young visual artists to have their work displayed in a professional setting and
to create connections with their local public gallery.

Local high school student, The Other Side, 2016, Juror's Choice in the 2017 High School Juried Art Show

February 9th – March 24th, 2018

About the Exhibition


The Winter Festival Art Show & Sale is the premier art event of northern Saskatchewan. In this exhibition hundreds of artworks by emerging and professional artists from across the province are shown at the Mann Art Gallery. Each year, a guest arts professional curates the exhibition and designates awards that are sponsored by local businesses and organizations. The exhibition is unveiled and awards are presented at an opening gala reception, followed the next day by an in-depth curatorial talk and walkthrough. Now entering its 42nd year, the Winter Festival exhibition is a well-regarded tradition that reflects an incredible level of artistic production in our community.

The Process


All Saskatchewan artists who are members of the Mann Art Gallery are invited to participate in this exhibition. (See Eligibility and Entry Instructions for details.) The artwork is dropped off at the gallery in late January. Over the subsequent two weeks, artworks are curated into our three gallery spaces by an independent guest curator. Past curators include Sandra Fraser, Grant McConnell, and Zachari Logan. Everyone who enters is guaranteed inclusion, so long as the artworks have been created within the last two years, have not been previously exhibited at the Mann Art Gallery, follow the size and hanging hardware guidelines.

2018 Winter Festival Guest Curator:

Carole Epp

Image: Carole Epp, Things Fall Apart, 2017, cone 6 clay, underglaze, and cold finish, 11 x 11 x 2.5”

Twenty years after taking my first ceramics class in college I’m still just as compelled and excited by this material as I was back then. Working in ceramics has allowed me to travel internationally to meet and work with some of the most inspiring creative minds out there. Back in 2005 I obtained my graduate degree from the Australian National University. I currently live in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan working in a home-based studio creating both functional objects and a line of figurative sculpture. Due to workaholic tendencies and a passion for community, I’ve been the editor of Musing About Mud (www.musingaboutmud.com) for over ten years, have brought together groups like Make and Do ceramics (www.makeanddo.ca) to highlight the wealth of creative ceramics here in Canada, traveled to teach workshops, give talks, exhibit work, and basically don’t say no to anything clay related that is worth promoting and getting involved with. All of which makes me happier than I ever imagined.
- Carole Epp, 2017

                             View Carole’s work and more at her website: www.caroleepp.com

 

PICK-UP DATES

Sunday March 25th and Monday March 26th, 2018 | 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Unsold artworks must be picked up by 5:00 PM on Monday March 26th or they will be disposed of at the discretion of the Gallery.  If, for extraordinary reasons, you cannot pick the work up on these days, you may call the Gallery no later than Friday March 17th to request a temporary extension. 

NOTE: Only under extenuating circumstances will we grant such an extension

Click here for detailed Eligibility & Entry Instructions.

Click here for the Winter Festival Entry form.

Click here for the 2018 Membership form.

42st Annual Winter Festival Art Show & Sale

Award Winners

 

Peggy & Sandy Kerr Memorial Award

Kurtiss Wykes, Calm, pyrography
 
Dana Wareing Popescul Memorial Award for Mixed Media
Kayanna Wirtz & Joel Rohs, Drum Kit, acrylic on wood & leather

 

John & Marjorie Hicks Memorial Award
Catherine Blackburn, Give Me Your Word, beads, birch bark, pins, velvet, thread, cotton


Art Placement Media Awards (all four media awards are sponsored by the Gallery/Art Placement Inc.):


The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Acrylic Painting
Earl McKay, Commemoration - Riel, bison skull art- acrylic
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Oil Painting
Denise Flaman, Pasting Away, acrylic, oil, magazine pages, soft pastel on canvas
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Watercolour

Paige Mortensen, Borden Bridge, watercolour batik
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in the Discipline of Drawing

Donna McKeand-Smith, Sojourn, ink on birch bark

 

Kyla Memorial Award

Sponsored by: Kyla Art Group

Patti Cannon-Levesque, Birch Grove, glass mosaic


Lorraine Mathiason Memorial Pottery Award

Sponsored by: Prince Albert Council for the Arts

Shirley McMahon, Ocean Flower, porcelain with permanent water colors

 

Fibre Art Award
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Spinners & Weavers Guild  

Heike Fink, Leopard Frog, needle felting
 
Photography Award
Sponsored by: Northern Image Photographers.  

Ron Cooley, Last Summer, digital photograph archival print
 
Needlework Award
Sponsored by: Sharp Needles Embroidery Guild 

June Jacobs, Lichen, fibre
 
The Mid-Pro Rock and Gem Society Lapidary Award
Sponsored by: Mid-Pro Rock and Gem Society

Noella Nesdoly, Psilomelane & Pearl, fine silver, sterling silver, psilomelane stone & freshwater pearl
 
Frank Sudol Memorial Award
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Woodturners Guild 

Marcel St. Amand, Leaves of Autumn, handcarved caragana, with gemstone
 
Hues Art Supply Store Award
Sponsored by: Hues Art Supply

Nicki Ault, Rustle, acrylic and oil on canvas
 
The Men Who Paint Award
Sponsored by: The Men Who Paint Group

Gail Carlson, Untitled, acrylic on canvas

 

GP Carlson Sculpture Award

Sponsored by: GP Carlson Gallery

Martin Markan, 031916, carpet, wood, masonary, polyurethane, fibre glass
 
2017 iMAGine Arts Education Prize
For free access to all Mann Art Gallery programs that otherwise have a fee

Sheila Devine

Third Place Prize
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Arts Board 

Dale Manton, Fish Bowl, birch, acrylic
 
Second Place Prize  
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Council for the Arts. 

Jaret Mayer, Guardian, metal, chains
 
The Mayor’s Prize & Best of Show
Sponsored by: City of Prince Albert and the Darrell Bell Gallery 

Kathy Bradshaw, I Once Roamed This Land, oil encaustic, rusty wire on cradled panel
 
 
Artworks Purchased into the Mann Art Gallery Permanent Collection:

 
Catherine Blackburn, Give Me Your Word, beads, birch bark, pins, velvet, thread, cotton
 
Hilary Johnstone, Early Snow in the Muskeg, fabric collage dyed cotton, commercial cotton, wool, batting thread

Heike Fink, Fluvial, wet felting
 
Andrea Guillet, White Onyx Pendant .925 setting, stone: white onyx cabachon set in .925 sterling silver

Patrick Bulas: The Cat That Slept on a Tortoise Shell

November 17th, 2017 – January 13th, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday November 17th, 7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Cat That Slept on a Tortoise Shell is a series of work inspired by Patrick Bulas’ cat, Lucy, and her ability to sleep anywhere she likes. Bulas illustrated Lucy sleeping on top of a tortoise, and then decided that she would not mind sleeping on the snout of a crocodile or curling up around the horn of a rhinoceros. These imagined encounters between Lucy and other animals, set in mezzotint, is an extension of the events in Bulas’ life at the time he created the prints. Pet owners frequently identify themselves with their cats, dogs, and other animals. They often populate folktales, fables, and myths, so much so that their anthropomorphic behavior can entertain and educate people. While none of the tales in these prints are linked to specific tales, they suggest stories that are left up to viewers to invent – and sometimes provide us with those valuable life lessons that only a cat can demonstrate.

 

A lighthearted approach, Bulas’ exhibition encourages viewers to imagine the ideal world where Lucy coexists with many people. The 20 – 25 mezzotints in this exhibition  allows for highly refined and detailed images to create environments that promote deep looking and joyful thinking.

Patrick Bulas, Sleepwalker, 2009, mezzotint, 29 x 33”

Imprint: Printmaking by Mac Hone

November 17th, 2017 – January 13th, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday November 17th, 7:00 PM

The Mann Art Gallery is pleased to present a selection of recent acquisitions by McGregor Hone. Imprint shows the spectrum of the techniques, subjects, and stylistic elements found in his original prints. Though he was interested in a variety of media, Mac began printing early in his career and it remained a major component of his practice. It is perhaps the work for which he is best remembered. Mac Hone was born in Prince Albert in 1920. He received a Bachelor of Arts and a Certificate in Education from the University of Saskatchewan, and frequently attended the Artist Workshops at Emma Lake. Mac had an immense impact as both an artist and educator: his painting By The Radio was the first piece to be acquired by the Saskatchewan Arts Board for their Permanent Collection, and he was instrumental in the development of the fine arts program at Central Collegiate in Regina.

 

This exhibition is possible thanks to a generous donation to the Mann Art Gallery from the families of David Hone and Jim Hall. In March 2015, they gifted a collection of artwork spanning the careers of McGregor and Beth Hone. Imprint is the first in a series of annual exhibitions that will show the Hone body of work in this unique collection.

 

This exhibition is curated by Jordan Bulgis, Permanent Collection intern funded by Young Canada Works – Building Careers in Heritage.

McGregor Hone, Untitled, n.d., print on paper, 65 x 51 cm

Colin Farnan

Saskatchewan Artists of Ability Festival

Oct. 19 - 21, 2017 in Prince Albert, Saskatoon, and Regina

Exhibition at Mann Art Gallery, Oct. 19 - Dec. 1 in Education Studio Gallery

 

The Artists of Ability Festival is an opportunity for artists with a disability to showcase their work during a festival that is accessible to all artists and audiences and will feature innovators in disciplines such as theatre, performance art, dance, music, visual art and new media.  Activities will include workshops, panel discussions, and opportunities for artists to network with each other and with arts organizations from around the province.

 

The Saskatchewan Artists of Abilities Festival is a provincial event on October 19, 20, 21, 2017. This is the first festival of its kind in the province. Disability arts have emerged as one of the most dynamic and culturally significant contemporary art forms in the last 20 years; gaining international momentum through exhibitions, performances, and festivals worldwide. The movement in disability arts is very new in Canada; only about 15 years old. At this time, there is no cohesive network or resources for artists with disabilities in Saskatchewan. Through exposure, the festival intends to build a strong community of artists with disabilities while also encouraging greater community awareness and involvement.

 

Festival supported by Spinal Cord Injury Saskatchewan Inc and funded through grants from Canada 150, Community Initiatives Fund, City of Saskatoon and the City of Regina. Presented in Prince Albert in partnership with the Mann Art Gallery.

 

Visit the Festival Website to see the list of talks, workshops and events in each of the three cities:

website:  https://saskartistsofability.wordpress.com/

Northern Image Photographers: Annual Exhibition

September 13th – October 27th, 2017
Opening Reception: Wednesday September 13th, 7:00 PM

 

Founded on the principle of excellence in photography, the Northern Image Photographers is a club composed of local people of all ages who share an interest in improving their photography, both technically and conceptually. The work of the Northern Image Photographers is  celebrated through an annual exhibition hosted by the Mann Art Gallery. Each year the gallery Director/Curator sets a theme or direction for members to explore in their photography, and members’ work is exhibited in the fall. The 2017 theme is “beyond the comfort zone.”

Lorna Blakeney, Spectacle, 2017

Love Stories: Listening and Seeing as Gestures Towards Reconciliation
An exhibition by Sandra Semchuk

Curated by Michel Boutin (Artistic Director of the Indigenous Peoples Artist Collective)

September 5th – October 26th, 2017
Opening Reception: Friday September 8th, 7:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sandra Semchuk, The Audience: Waiting for the Poundmaker Cree to tell the Story of the Attempt to Massacre Them at Cut Knife Hill in 1885, 2010-12, lightjet photograph, 14 x 70"

The Indigenous Peoples Artist Collective (IPAC) is an Aboriginal artist collective based out of Prince Albert, SK. IPAC’s mandate is to disseminate, create, and promote contemporary Aboriginal and urban artistic practices for the benefit of regional artists and audiences. The work that IPAC undertakes helps to lessen the alienation that can exist between Indigenous communities and the contemporary arts world. IPAC is dedicated to revealing various cultural perspectives within the region and promote inclusiveness, diversity, and cooperation, while challenging the status quo and maintaining a high level of artistic integrity.

 

IPAC and the Mann Art Gallery partner on numerous events. IPAC’s Annual Two Story Café, that takes place every fall, includes an exhibition at the Mann Art Gallery curated by Michel Boutin. The show features work by a past or present member of IPAC. In 2017, IPAC and the MAG are pleased to present an exhibition by Sandra Semchuk, who completed a residency with IPAC in 2010. Sandra is no stranger to northern Saskatchewan. Born and raised in Meadow Lake, she received her BFA from the University of Saskatchewan in 1970. Sandra was a founding member of Saskatoon's Photography Gallery later to become Paved Arts new media Artist Run  Centre, an amalgamation of The Photographers Gallery and Video Vérité. 

 

Sandra is a storyteller, photographer and video artist who often works collaboratively using the familial, autobiography, and dialogue across generations, cultures and species. She worked with her late husband, James Nicholas, Cree actor and orator, to consider potential conciliations within the self and between the indigenous and non-indigenous. Their dialogue was grounded in experience in the primary knowledges of place land, flora and fauna and weather and in human stories. The more-than- human was always the larger context. In addition to her art practice, Sandra teaches at Emily Carr University in Vancouver, BC.

Two Métis Vests

Installation shot from Two Métis Vests by Leah Dorion, June 2017

A celebration of pride and heritage - a donation by Leah Marie Dorion to the Permanent Collection of the Mann Art Gallery

 

Two Métis Vests is one of five early readers' books written and illustrated in 2014 by Prince Albert artist, educator, storyteller, filmmaker, and author, Leah Marie Dorion. She donated the 47 illustration paintings for these books to the Permanent Collection of the Mann Art Gallery in June 2015. 

As in all of her book illustrations, Leah's love of teaching, especially teaching young children, shines through. Her pride in her subject matter - Métis heritage - and in this particular series, traditional Métis garments, is evident in her careful selection and arrangement of details and concepts.

 Page by page, the two vests, both beloved and traditional to Métis culture, are compared for similarities and differences, while key words for the early readers are repeated. Leah shows us, through simple yet vibrant, bold images, how traditional First Nations' natural materials and technology - tanned deer hide, sinew thread and bone awl, bone fastenings, porcupine quillwork, leather fringe - and European trade goods - velvet cloth, glass beads, metal needles, and ribbon - are both used by Métis women to create beautiful and functional garments.

The simple yet detailed illustrations of steps and materials suggest that we, too, with the right materials, tools, and a knowledgeable teacher, could partake in this beautiful tradition.

 

Talking Together

Leah asks the following questions in her book:

  1. What is the same about the two Métis vests? What is different?

  2. Which do you like the best? Why?

  3. Which do you think would be the hardest to make? Why?

 

 

Leah's generous gift of A Métis New Year, Two Métis Vests, A Red River Cart, Giving Thanks, and Ways to Carry a Métis Baby series will be celebrated by generations of Prince Albert citizens. The books are published by Strong Nations Publishing Inc (www.strongnations.com).

Prince Albert Grand Council
Fine Arts Festival

June 12 – August 25th, 2017

Installation shot from Prince Albert Grand Council Fine Arts Festival, June 2017

In April 2017, the Prince Albert Grand Council (PAGC) celebrated the 26th Annual Fine Arts Festival. Each year, this weeklong event showcases visual art, drama, dance, music, and literature by First Nations’ students at PAGC schools in central- and north-Saskatchewan. The Fine Arts Festival originated from an observation in the early 1990s that there was a lack of opportunities to show the creative work and talents of students outside of Saskatchewan’s major centers. The festival has increased from a few hundred participants in its early years to more than 1,700 kindergarten to grade twelve students in 2017. It is an incredible display of artistic ability and growth that brings together people from multiple generations and geographic locations to share, celebrate, and nurture the hard work of First Nations’ youth. 

The Mann Art Gallery is pleased to have on display a selection of outstanding artworks, including many artworks that received awards from local professional jurors, from the Festival. The eighteen artworks were created by elementary students in Divisions 1 & 2. These young students show us that inspiration comes from many perspectives: modern pop culture, local heritage, animal symbology, love of family, and cultural traditions. Teachers are inspiring their students to work with a wide range of artistic media, from traditional materials like beads, fur, leather, antlers, and felt, to contemporary digital art and graphic design.

The diversity amongst this group of works gives an indication of how youth in First Nations communities are directing their creative energies, while demonstrating that visual art is a valuable form of expression to share our own experiences and views.

 

This exhibition is possible thanks to the Prince Albert Grand Council, Shona Stapleton, Sheryl Kimbley, art instructors at participating schools, and the young artists whose work is on display.

 

Congratulations, and thank you for the opportunity to share

your creative gifts!

Installation shot from Two Métis Vests by Leah Dorion, June 2017

Bonnie Gilmour & Charley Farrero, Morley Orille, Bobo, and Mini Marmousete 2015, ceramics, 8 x 8”

Bonnie Gilmour & Charley Farrero: Le Look

July 13th – September 5th, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Spring 2015, Saskatchewan ceramic artists Bonnie Gilmour and Charley Farrero were invited to participate in a ceramics residency at St. Quentin la Poterie, a small medieval pottery village in southern France. The work that was produced during this residency exhibited in France, and will now be shown in Le Look at the Mann Art Gallery.

 

Le Look consists of 14 ceramic face jars with hats. The face jars were created by Gilmour, while Farrero fashioned the ceramic hats, or lids. These jars are the artists’ contemporary interpretation of the folk tradition of “ugly” face jugs that originated in southern USA. The folk tale is one of warning and judgment. Many years ago, it is said that moonshine was placed into pottery jugs, but children had a habit of getting into the drink. Potters therefore put ugly faces on the jugs to scare away the children. Later, the jugs were also placed at grave sites to scare evil spirits. Pottery with faces has a long tradition and appears in many cultures. Today, face jugs are prized by collectors around the world for their comical facial expressions.

George Glenn: Redefinition

26 May - 19 August 2017 
OPENING RECEPTION: Friday 26 May at 7:00 PM - In-conversation with George Glenn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

For decades George has been well regarded as a still life painter and one of the finest art educators in Saskatchewan. Raised in Regina and educated at the University of Manitoba (BFA Hons, 1970) and University of Cincinnati (MFA, 1974) George moved to Prince Albert in 1975, initially on a temporary basis as artist-in-residence. He primarily painted unassuming objects with his perspective on beauty, that he defines as “stillness brought to life.” But following his retirement in 2013, George’s energy and invention in painting have a new charge. Some say that his practice is growing “weirder and weirder.*” This newfound liberty in art is displayed in Redefinition, with his latest works that resist classification of both genre and media. In addition to showing a redefinition of George’s artistic approach, it also illustrates a new chapter in his career that has been shaped by time, media, and place.

*Andrée Felley-Martinson, in conversation with George Glenn at a studio visit at Christopher Lake, SK, summer 2016

 

George Glenn, Pedestal Plate #3, 2016, acrylic on terra skin, 28 x 38”

Paige Mortensen: Portals

26 May - 8 July 2017 
OPENING RECEPTION: Friday 26 May at 7:00 PM

Paige Mortensen, Stories inside VIII, 2014, watercolour batik, 12 x 18”

Paige Mortensen is a Saskatoon-based artist who works in watercolour batik, Batik is an ancient art form originally created with wax and dyes on fabric. The watercolour batik process still uses wax as a resist, but Mortensen works on Ginwashi paper and uses watercolours as the pigment. The resulting pieces have a fabric look to them and are filled with texture. Mortensen’s watercolour batiks contain soft colours, rich texture, and a gentle image that invites viewers to look deeper into both the content and the material.

Appropriately, the MAG has in its Permanent Collection four batik works created by Margreet van Walsem, who played a key role in forming Prince Albert’s vibrant visual arts culture in the 1970s. Van Walsem’s batiks were show from November 2016 to January 2017 in the MAG’s annual Permanent Collection exhibition. Connecting the batik works in the Permanent Collection to Mortensen’s, Portals will showcase the development
of a specific medium by a contemporary artist. As both van Walsem and Mortensen were strongly influenced by place, Portals shows that entry ways to art are shaped in this part of Saskatchewan in large part by local geography and architecture. In her work, Mortensen is intrigued by and wonders about the people who used to live in our current homes, the people who built these places, and what their lives were like.

Heather Benning
A Prairie Gothic: Let Our Fields Be Broader, But Our Nights So Much Darker

31 March - 13 May 2017

Heather Benning, Work Hard Be Nice, 2014, plastic, enamel, oil paint, wood.

Saskatchewan artist Heather Benning has a growing international reputation for producing large-scale, site-specific installations within natural environments, presenting interventions in outdoor locations and abandoned and decaying architectural spaces. Another focus of her practice is creating gallery-based installations and, most recently, working in video. It is these latter practices that will be featured in the exhibition A Prairie Gothic: Let Our Fields Be Broader, But Our Nights So Much Darker, organized by the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery. Presenting four bodies of work and her new film, The Dollhouse, the exhibition offers viewers intricately woven narratives that address notions of place, loss, the perceived ‘otherness’ of rural life and the construction of gender and femininity. Each series contributes to an overarching narrative of the prairie gothic. Stories of innocence, haunting memories and romantic ideals of settler life on the prairies are intertwined with dark narratives and tragic loss. Benning presents viewers with iconic images and monuments of prairie rural life that not only acknowledge the passing of an era, the loss of a connection to our rural roots, idyllic dreams that are never realized and the inevitability of change, but also reflect a sensitivity and respect for the individual lives and stories, whether real or imagined, that collectively contribute towards a prairie sensibility or even mythology. (Jennifer McRorie, Curatorial Director of the Moose Jaw Museum and Art Gallery)

This exhibition is organized by the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery in partnership with the Art Gallery of Swift Current and the Mann Art Gallery.

6th Annual High School Juried Art Show

6 April - 13 May 2017

Curated by Lana Wilson, Gallery Educator

Installation shot from the High School Juried Art Show, April 2017

The imagination, talents, and hard work of local youth are celebrated in this exhibition that represents students from Prince Albert and surrounding area. Creative expression allows individuals of all ages to interpret the world around them and to express their concerns, dreams, and nightmares. The diversity of work featured in this exhibition exemplifies the notion that inspiration comes in many forms and that art and art making allows us to share our unique experiences with others.

41st Annual Winter Festival Juried Art Show & Sale

10 February - 25 March 2017

Scroll down for more information!

About the Exhibition
The Winter Festival Art Show & Sale is the premier art event of northern Saskatchewan. In this exhibition, hundreds of artworks by emerging and professional artists from across the province are shown at the Mann Art Gallery. A guest juror curates the show and designates awards sponsored by local organizations. Now entering its 41st year, the exhibition reflects an incredible level of artistic production in our community.

The Process
All Saskatchewan artists and artisans who are members of the Mann Art Gallery are invited to participate in this exhibition. The artwork is dropped off at the Gallery in late January. Over the course of the subsequent two weeks, artworks are curated into our three gallery spaces by an independent guest curator. Past curators include Sandra Fraser (Mendel Art Gallery), Marsha Kennedy(University of Regina) and Grant McConnell (University of Saskatchewan). Everyone who enters is guaranteed inclusion, so long as the artworks follow the size guidelines and are outfitted with the correct hanging hardware. During the Gala Reception, the exhibition is unveiled for the first time and prizes are awarded.  The day after the reception, the guest curator provides a detailed walk-through tour to discuss their curating process, award decisions, and will provide critiques if requested.

Guest Curator:
ZACHARI LOGAN

Zachari Logan, Leshy (detail), 2013, pastel on paper, 50 x 110"

Zachari Logan's work has been exhibited widely, in group and solo exhibitions throughout North America and Europe, including: Athens, Amsterdam, Atlanta, Barcelona, Berlin, Brussels, Cincinnati, Chicago, Calgary, Edmonton, Grenoble, London, Los Angeles, Miami, Montreal, New York, Ottawa, Regina, Paris, Seattle, Tampa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Verona, and Vienna, and can be found in public and private collections worldwide. Logan has attended residencies in Paris in conjunction with Galerie Jean Roch Dard, in rural Tennessee at Sassafras ARC/Liberty, in Calgary through ACAD’s Visiting Artist Program, in Vienna several times through both the Museum Quartier’s quartier21: Artist in Residence Program and project space Schliefmuhlgasse 12-14, and in London at Angus-Hughes Gallery. In the spring of 2015 Logan attended the International Studio and Curatorial Program, and returned to NYC during the winter of 2016 as artist in residence at Wave Hill Botanical Gardens in the Bronx. 

NEW in 2017

the iMAGine Arts Education Professional Development Prize

The Mann Art Gallery is pleased to offer a new Winter Festival prize. One artist who enters the exhibition will have the opportunity to participate in all iMAGine Arts Education programs FREE for the remainder of 2017. This includes life drawing sessions, workshops, and any education programs that have costs attached. This prize can even be transferred to a local child to participate in our kids’ art camps on school breaks and in the summer. We will draw an artist’s name for this prize at the opening gala reception on Friday February 10th, 2017.

41st Annual Winter Festival Juried Art Show & Sale

Award Winners

 

Peggy & Sandy Kerr Memorial Award

James Clow, Silver Buffalo, acrylic and sterling silver on canvas
 
Dana Wareing Popescul Memorial Award for Mixed Media
Anita Rocamora, Bonsai, clay and metal

 

John & Marjorie Hicks Memorial Award
Michel Boutin, Old Boy, enamel on canvas


Art Placement Media Awards (all four media awards are sponsored by the Gallery/Art Placement Inc.):


The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Acrylic Painting
Kim Morrall, Le Jardin du Monet, acrylic on board
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Oil Painting
Rhonda Rasmussen, Brisk Stroll, oil on canvas
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in Watercolour

June Ricklefs, Twists and Turns, watercolour on paper
 
The Art Placement Media Award for Accomplishments in the Discipline of Drawing
Jerome Mrazek, The House Across the Street, charcoal on paper

 

Kyla Memorial Award

Sponsored by: Kyla Art Group

Hilary Johnstone, Island on Fire, fabric, thread, batting


Lorraine Mathiason Memorial Pottery Award

Sponsored by: Prince Albert Council for the Arts

Tom Gertz, Alligator Crawl, pottery

 

Fibre Art Award
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Spinners & Weavers Guild  

June Jacobs, Seasonal Connect, fibre
 
Photography Award
Sponsored by: Northern Image Photographers.  

Ron Cooley, Downtown Mosaic, digital photograph archival inkjet print
 
Needlework Award
Sponsored by: Sharp Needles Embroidery Guild 

Kylee Blackburn, Northern Negativity, film negatives and sinew
 
The Mid-Pro Rock and Gem Society Lapidary Award
Sponsored by: Mid-Pro Rock and Gem Society

Andrea Guillet, Chrysocolla Pendant, chrysacolla stone cabbed original .925 silver setting handmade
 
Frank Sudol Memorial Award
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Woodturners Guild 

Marcel St. Amand, Special Jem, hand-carved caragana walking stick
 
Hues Art Supply Store Award
Sponsored by: Hues Art Supply

Shirley McMahon, Dance of Honour, watercolour and pastel on paper
 
The Men Who Paint Award
Sponsored by: The Men Who Paint Group

Judy McNaughton, Self-Portrait with Egg Shell, acrylic, graphite, and tar gel on terra skin
 
2017 iMAGine Arts Education Prize
For free access to all Mann Art Gallery programs that otherwise have a fee

Heather Adamson

Third Place Prize
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Arts Board 

Pat Bliss, Tower Duty, acrylic on canvas
 
Second Place Prize  
Sponsored by: Prince Albert Council for the Arts. 

Kylee Blackburn, Northern Negativity, film negatives and sinew
 
The Mayor’s Prize & Best of Show
Sponsored by: City of Prince Albert and the Darrell Bell Gallery 

Carol Wylie, Odalisque, oil on canvas
 
 
Artworks Purchased into the Mann Art Gallery Permanent Collection:

 
Pat Bliss, Tower Duty, acrylic on canvas
 
Karen Pask-Thompson, Dismissed, oil, acrylic, and graphite on canvas

Michel Boutin, Old Boy, enamel on canvas
 
Kylee Blackburn, Northern Negativity, film negatives and sinew
 
Carol Wylie, Odalisque, oil on canvas
 
Earl McKay, Memories of Days Gone By, acrylic on bison skull

Then & Now: Selections from the Permanent Collection

14 November 2016 - 14 January 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then & Now shows connections between artworks that have come into the MAG’s Permanent Collection over the past sixteen years. This exhibition traces links amongst local and regional artists, subjects, and styles that make up the Collection in its current state. Some connections show clear parallels across a range of ages, with younger artists being influenced by the aesthetics of those from generations prior. In other cases, the links demonstrate multiple artists’ different points of view on the same topics. The development of personal practices will also be evident thanks to acquisitions of individuals artists’ early and more recent pieces.

 

This exhibition provides a lens to examine artists’ perspectives while also acting as record of collecting within an art institution. It is evident that local Prince Albert artistic trends and sites of active art making are well represented, especially in regards to the Emma Lake workshops. The exhibition also highlights gaps that have yet to be filled within the Permanent Collection. Noticeable in this exhibition is a lack of Indigenous artwork, for example. This is currently a collecting priority, and as it is filled, will make the Collection even more reflective of and inspiring to the local community. As the Mann Art Gallery continues to develop its strong Permanent Collection, it will be a key indicator of how the visual art community is energetic and growing, both then & now.

Installation shot from Then & Now, November 2016

Paula Cooley, Lucent (detail), 2014, porcelain and steel, 205 x 95 x 14 cm

Paula Cooley: MIX

14 November 2016 - 14 January 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paula Cooley’s practice is inspired by the natural world. Her work suggests the dynamic vitality of plants, water, wind, and earth, but does not serve as literal representations. Instead, her sculptures look as if they are mutating organisms or evolving formations, the curious and unusual products of natural selection. Having an interest in Surrealism and Modernist sculpture (particularly the work of Hans Arp, Louis Bourgeoise, and Barbara Hepworth), she strives to make work that is sensuous, elegant, and controlled yet tinged with the grotesque. In Mix, these dualities of beauty vs. grotesque, attraction vs. menace, and organic vs. industrial lead her to create ambiguous forms that are animated, whimsical, and otherworldly.

10/10: An Exhibition Celebrating 10 Years of the Two Story Cafe

Curated by Michel Boutin, Artistic Director of the Indigenous Peoples Artist Collective

14 September - 14 October 2016

IPAC in partnership with The Mann Art Gallery is marking the 10th Anniversary of the Two Story Café and 10 plus years of successful partnerships by hosting the exhibition 10/10. The exhibition showcases visual art works from 10 artists who have presented performance art pieces in Prince Albert over the last 10 years of the Two Story Café.

Gerald Murphy, Nature`s Original Corkscrew, 2016, photograph

Ten Year Anniversary Exhibition: Northern Image Photographers

14 September - 14 October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Founded on the principle of excellence in photography, the Northern Image Photographers is a club composed of local people of all ages who share an interest in improving their photography, both technically and conceptually.

 

The work of the Northern Image Photographers is  celebrated through an annual exhibition hosted by the Mann Art Gallery. Each year a different theme is explored. 2016 marks the 10th anniversary that the photographers have displayed their work at the gallery. Therefore, this year members were encouraged to showcase images that reflect the club name. Appropriately, the club hosts weekend  photo tours twice per year in various locations, numerous being in northern Saskatchewan. Many of the photographers focus primarily on nature and outdoor themes, and enjoy sharing images that highlight the great scenic opportunities close to home.

Grant McConnell, Circus Comes To Town, 2016, acrylic on wood, 211 x 241 cm

Grant McConnell: PowerHouse

27 July - 7 September 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PowerHouse is Grant McConnell’s series of paintings and drawings that show recognizable government buildings and other Canadian architecture incorporated with western art historical imagery. In this collaborative approach, the government motifs traverse through familiar styles including Klee-esque abstraction, the surrealism of Magritte, Giacometti’s sculptural forms, and the still lifes of Dutch Golden Age artists up to the modern Morandi. Each work in the exhibition provides viewers with visual jumping off points to consider just how much power the government holds in one’s house.

 

McConnell is a Saskatoon-based artist and educator. He is known primarily for his acrylic on wood painting that is derived from an ongoing investigation of subject matter related to Canadian historical themes. This work varies in approach, from a more meditative engagement with still life, to imagery that includes urban and rural landscape references and animal life. Mixed media is an increasingly significant part of his practice, as is three-dimensional work. McConnell’s pieces are in numerous private and public collections across Canada. He currently sits as President and National Spokesperson on the National Board of CARFAC.

Light Painting (with glowstick), Northern Indigenous Media Art Project,  2016, digital photo

Northern Indigenous Media Arts Project 3 

25 August - 15 October 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Northern Indigenous Media Art Project (NIMAP) uses photo media, technology, and storytelling to create a vibrant

and relevant program for youth. Linking contemporary media with traditional forms of expression, artist leaders Aleyna May Morin, Tim Moore, and guest facilitators held 2-day workshops in La Ronge, Muskoday First Nation, Prince Albert, and Beardy’s & Okemasis Willow Cree First Nation in July. More than 45 youth, aged 7—19, made light painting photographs, cyanotypes, filmed interviews, developed Polaroids, and took digital photos on community walking tours. Media art can be a powerful tool to create rich exchanges between generations within a community. We invite you to be a part of this exchange as we proudly present the images created by our participants and leaders.

River M, Walking Bear, 2016, Acrylic on canvas

Prince Albert Grand Council: Fine Arts Festival Display 

27 May - 20 August 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In April 2016, the Prince Albert Grand Council (PAGC) celebrated the 25th Annual Fine Arts Festival. Each year, this weeklong event showcases visual art, drama, dance, music, and literature by First Nations’ students at PAGC schools in central- and north-Saskatchewan. The Fine Arts Festival originated from an observation in the early 1990s that there was a lack of opportunities to show the creative work and talents of students outside of Saskatchewan’s major centers. The festival has increased from a few hundred participants in its early years to more than 1,700 kindergarten to grade twelve students in 2016. It is an incredible display of artistic ability and growth that brings together people from multiple generations and geographic locations to share, celebrate, and nurture the hard work of First Nations’ youth. 

The Mann Art Gallery is pleased to have on display artworks that received awards, designated by local professionals who were recruited to judge the students’ work, during this year’s Fine Arts Festival. The artworks were created by students in grades seven to eleven. The young artists began to work on their ideas and techniques at the start of the school year, building up to the final pieces that were shown at the festival in April.

The eleven select pieces show compositional strength that in turn conveys strong messages of what is important to each student. Whether it be their individual interests, dreams, concerns, or subjective views of beauty, these works demonstrate that inspiration comes from many perspectives: modern pop culture, local heritage, animal symbology, and cultural traditions. The diversity amongst this group of works gives an indication of how youth in First Nations communities are directing their creative energies, while demonstrating that visual art is a valuable form of expression to share our own experiences and views.

Michèle Mackasey, Lana Fidler with her Children Preston & Brielle, 2011, oil on linen, 157 x 183 cm

Michèle Mackasey: face à nous

6 June - 16 July 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Face à nous puts the spotlight on single mothers. Mackasey’s large portrait paintings of Saskatchewan families capture the bond between mothers and their children, as well as point to the complex family dynamics where the father is literally out of the picture. In Mackasey’s life-size oil and acrylic paintings, the artist imbues her subjects with the dignity and stature that has been associated with portrait painting for centuries. Yet these portraits depict families , who continue to live on the margins, facing prejudice and economic hardship with mothers balancing the roles of sole provider and caregiver. Mackasey utilizes body language, facial expression and composition with great empathy in this moving and and insightful series of paintings.

In her work Michèle Mackasey addresses issues of humanity and social justice. She studied drawing and painting at the Ontario College of Art and Design  and has shown her work in exhibitions across Canada. Mackasey would like to thank the Saskatchewan Arts Board, Canadian Heritage, and Conseil culturel fransaskois for project support.

Joe Fafard, Jimenez , 2014, patinated bronze, 56 x 81  x 23 cm

Joe Fafard: Sunny Ways 

27 May - 9 July 2016

Organized by Slate Fine Art Gallery

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sunny Ways shows a selection of Joe Fafard’s bronze and laser steel-cut works created between 2008 and 2014. The exhibition pays homage to Fafard’s farming roots. His value of the natural world is demonstrated by the many moments that he depicts horses and cows: we view them standing in profile, curled up and resting, galloping with hair flying in the wind, and strolling about the pasture. Whether seen at eye-level, from above, or below, Fafard is constantly exploring the numerous sculptural forms of familiar animals. It can be easy to pass by cows and horses without giving them much thought, but for Fafard they exude character and a spirit that he in turn expresses in his artwork.

The title Sunny Ways is a reference to the philosophy that positivity can be a powerful method to affect change. It asserts that being optimistic, fair, and just in relationships yields better results than acting with force. Sunny Ways was the modus operandi of Sir Wilfred Laurier in the 1890s, and more recently has been quoted upon the election of current Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. In Fafard’s works, it is a reminder that we all share the same resources on this planet. We live together with animals in nature and are dependent upon them – this artwork is a way to recognize the heritage that has fed our mouths and our economy.

Detail from FEED, 2014, used clothing and bale netting, 152 x 152 x 152 cm

Mindy Yan Miller: FEED

15 April - 26 May 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yan Miller’s art is rooted in fibre traditions and frequently uses masses of potent materials in site-responsive installations. She holds an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and has taught at Concordia University since 1990. She has also exhibited in Canada, Europe, and the United States since the mid-1980s. Utilizing materials like used clothing, human hair, coke cans, and more recently cowhides, her work addresses the thematics of labour, identity, loss, and commodification.

FEED, Yan Miller’s project for the Moose Jaw Art Gallery, questions the irrationalities of globalization. Relocating from Montreal to Saskatchewan in 2010, Yan Miller’s earlier concerns with consumption and the oppressive practices of globalized and unregulated labour are now placed within the ideological history of the Canadian prairies. Working from a 21st century economic paradigm, FEED is full of concern: noting the impact of contemporary global economies, this exhibition may at once refer to sustenance for livestock, the digital output register of the stock market, or the "fashion feed" of the contemporary glamour industry.

K. Roy-Chovin, Five Frogs (detail), clay, 2016

5th Annual High School Juried Art Show

15 April - 21 May 2016

Curated by Lana Wilson, Gallery Educator

 

 

 

 

 

 

The imagination, talents, and hard work of local youth are celebrated in this exhibition that represents students from Prince Albert and surrounding area. Creative expression allows individuals of all ages to interpret the world around them and to express their concerns, dreams, and nightmares. The diversity of work featured in this exhibition exemplifies the notion that inspiration comes in many forms and that art and art making allows us to share our unique experiences with others.

Darrell Bell, Evening, oil on canvas, 122 x 183 cm

40th Annual Winter Festival Juried Art Show & Sale

12 February - 2 April 2016

Guest curated by Darrell Bell

The Winter Festival Juried Art Show & Sale is the premier art event of Northern Saskatchewan. Each year, hundreds of artworks by emerging and professional artists from across the province are show at the Mann Art Gallery. A guest juror curates the show and designates awards sponsored by local organizations. Now entering its 40th year, the exhibition reflects an incredible level of artistic production in our community. 

All artists and artisans are invited to participate in the exhibition, but they must be members of the Mann Art Gallery.  A maximum of two artworks can be submitted. (See Eligibility and Entry Instructions for details.) The artwork is dropped off at the Gallery on specified days in January. Over the course of the subsequent two weeks, artworks are juried into our three gallery spaces by an independent guest juror. Past jurors include Sandra Fraser (Mendel Art Gallery), Marsha Kennedy (University of Regina) and Grant McConnell (University of Saskatchewan). Everyone who enters is guaranteed inclusion! During the Gala Reception, various prizes are awarded.  The day after the reception, the juror provides a walk-through tour to discuss their processes and decisions.

Darrell Bell is an artist, art appraiser, and gallery owner who lives in Saskatoon. Born in Saskatchewan, and educated at the University of Saskatchewan, Darrell has been painting and exhibiting his works since 1982. He has had numerous group and solo show across Canada. He is well-known for capturing light in his water, sky, and landscapes that depict the grandeur of the prairies. His work is in public and corporate collections in Brazil, Canada, USA, Australia, France, Germany, Saudi Arabia, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Africa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mann Art is located on Treaty 6 territory, the traditional territory of Cree Peoples and the homeland of the Metis Nation

Presented with Common Weal Community Arts 

Cheryl L'Hirondelle

Wintercount and Other Freedom Songs

 

Sep. 12 - Oct. 24, 2019

 

image: still from Wintercount music video

© 2019 by the Mann Art Gallery Inc.

  • Facebook Clean
  • Twitter Clean
  • Instagram - White Circle

142-12th Street West, Prince Albert SK, S6V 3B5

Treaty 6 Territory & homeland of the Metis Nation